Don’t Follow Your Heart

“Mommy, Mulan says ‘My duty is to my heart’ and ‘Follow your heart.’ What does she mean?”

Firstly, it was not really the heroine Hua Mulan of the Ballad of Mulan (木蘭辭) whom my daughter was quoting above. It was the Disney rendition of a Mulan who disapproved of the culture of arranged marriages of her time, produced as a sequel to the splendid animation of the heroic tale of the Disney’s 1998 Mulan.

Viewed in such context, what this Mulan was trying to say was “Go marry the one your heart really loves.” Freedom, be true to self; the value which was very much American during my childhood years, and one that is widely and readily embraced today.

Yet, appealing as it sounds, I have to tell my daughter that to follow our own hearts is to tread down the path of dangers. How true, or rather, how misguided our hearts can be, surely we can all attest to ourselves.

How many of us whose hearts have justified losing the first ‘love’ in our spouses yet finding it in someone new? How many of us whose hearts, in the name of being true to self, have led our loved ones into utter ruin and anguish? How many lives have been broken by those who claim the right of doing things as their hearts please? And to bring the matter closer to the one asking the question, what would have happened had a four-year-old decided to go about her day following her own heart?

“Our hearts are sick, it cannot tell us what we must and must not do. But there is a Person whose Word can tell us what we must and must not do, and that Person can heal our sick hearts. He is the One we should follow.”

“I know! That Person is God!”

“Indeed.”

Indeed, as was the prayer we had been reciting at the end of our family devotion weeks ago:

“My heart is deceitful above all things
and desperately sick.
Heal me, O LORD,
and I shall be healed;
save me and I shall be saved,
for you are the one I praise.”
– Jeremiah 17:9,14

Heal our hearts, O LORD.

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